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Locksmiths in Mornington offer a highly demanded service, which generally relates to maintaining and installing the various types of lock systems, from the standard key locks to the complex electronic or biometric locks. The most common types of locksmith professions consist of the emergency, industrial, commercial, and residential, which each of the specific fields requiring different skills and abilities.

Sliding Door Lock

 

Residential work is likely to be the most common of the services provided by a residential locksmith. A domestic property owner looks at personal security and safety as a key reason when it comes to making sure a home is fully secured against a would-be intruder. A locksmith has gained the experience and knowledge to suggest the most effective locks for a properties doors and windows. Beyond the ability to install new locking systems, the locksmith is also able to repair or replace the locks on the older styled properties. Extra services offered by a local locksmiths offer security advice, a key cutting service, installing locks on a garage or similar outbuilding, and installing at-home safes or vaults.

How Do I Choose A Residential Locksmith in Mornington?

Rekey Locks Changing LocksMany enquiries that locksmiths receive, are about the cost to change locks.Often, clients are meaning to inquire as to just changing the combinations of their existing locks, so they can maintain the same hardware on their doors.Or when the keys to their house, office or automobile have been misplaced, stolen or even copied unknowingly (suspected), they experience the need to re-code their locks. Also many new home buyers or new tenants want to make sure that previous residents of their property can no longer gain entry.Locksmiths across the country vary greatly in their fees. There are accepted industry averages published in locksmith publications like The National Locksmith magazine and the Locksmith Ledger magazine annually, but the going rate can vary from around $5.00 per keyhole to as much as $20.00 per keyhole for residential or commercial door locks and from $10.00 to $35.00 for automobile locks. Often this does not include labor for the removal and refitting of locks.Master-keying is another charge that most locksmiths charge slightly higher fees for. Often, specialist products like Medeco or Multlock or Primus or Best or Assa or Abloy or Bilock products can incur significantly increased fees due to the higher cost for the pin or disc tumblers.Altering the lock combinations on your doors is very important to maintaining your peace of mind, the security and privacy of your family members, fellow workers etc.There are multiple brands that offer key control to further protect from unauthorised duplication of your keys. Contacting your local locksmith is the best option to determine the most suitable and cost effective approach.

Associated Locksmiths of America

Keypad Lock   (Redirected from Certified Professional Locksmith) Jump to navigation Jump to search ALOA Security Professionals Association (ALOA, formerly known as the Associated Locksmiths of America) is an American trade organization for locksmiths and other physical security professionals.[1][unreliable source?] The organization represents more than 6,000 locksmiths in the United States, Canada, and other countries, making it the largest association of its sort in North America, and conducts professional proficiency certifications for its members. ALOA’s activities include a continuing education (ACE) program, an annual convention and security exposition, and the ALOA Training Center, based in Dallas, Texas. The Associated Locksmiths of America (ALOA) was founded in 1955.[2] The executive secretary was Lee Rognon of Modena, New York,[3] with the organization establishing its first headquarters in Kingston, a city located about 25 miles north of Modena.[4] The group held its first biennial convention in Chicago from July 14–16, 1956, at the Sherman Hotel, bringing together locksmiths from around the country.[5] The 1956 National Convention and Trade Show was directed and managed by Robert Rognon,[6] husband of Lee Rognon. The show was expected to draw 3,000 participants from 46 of the 48 American states.[6] The 1958 ALOA National Convention was again held at the Sherman Hotel in Chicago, and was a two-day affair, running the weekend of July 19–20.[7] Among the activities conducted by the convention was a lock-picking contest, with Glen Hickenlooper of Salt Lake City, Utah, proclaimed the national champion for a second time.[8] In 1960, ALOA turned to Washington, DC as the location for its third biennial convention, also held in the middle of July. About 1200 members of the organization were in attendance, where they were viewed demonstrations of new burglary-prevention devices and were photographed and fingerprinted for identification in an effort to raise professional standards for locksmiths.[9] The convention once again was the scene of a lock-picking competition, in which Flora E. Gebhart of Shamokin, Pennsylvania won the women's division with a time of 1 minute and 41 seconds to pick a standard door lock.[10] ALOA Executive Director and Treasurer Lee Rognon as she appeared in 1961. The headquarters of the Associated Locksmiths of America was moved from Kingston, New York to Dallas, Texas, in the summer of 1973.[4] In addition to its executive offices, the group moved its central library of literature related to the history and practice of locksmithing to its new Dallas facility at this time.[4] Lee Rognon remained Executive Director of ALOA at the time of the organization's move.[4] During the early 1970s the Associated Locksmiths produced two short educational films as part of an outreach program highlighting security issues with owners of homes and businesses. The first of these, Invitation to Burglary, narrated by actor Raymond Burr, dealt with residential crime and its prevention, while the second, Rip Off, narrated by actor Henry Fonda, concerned the security problems of business and industry.[11] Both of these short films were made available for use by ALOA to groups able to raise an audience of 25 persons or more.[11] ALOA hosts an annual Locksmith and Security Exhibition.[12] The group also conducts a membership program for locksmiths in Mexico and the Spanish-speaking diaspora called "ALOA LATINO."[13] ALOA holds frequent proficiency certification sessions for experienced locksmiths. Through its Proficiency Registration Program (PRP), ALOA offers five locksmith membership designations: (1) Registered Locksmith (RL);[14] (2) Certified Registered Locksmith (CRL); (3) Certified Professional Locksmith (CPL); (4) Certified Master Locksmith (CML); and (5) Certified Automotive Locksmith (CAL)[15] ALOA owns the Safe and Vault Technicians Association (SAVTA) and proctors the examinations for its specialty certifications, which include Certified Professional SafeTech (CPS) and Certified Master Safe Technician (CMST). ALOA publishes a periodical for its members, a magazine called Keynotes. Home Lock

 

Victoria Qualified Emergency Locksmith

Locksmith Mornington

In need of a mobile locksmith Mornington? Welcome to Excellent Locksmiths, we’re your local lock pros for residential, commercial, and all emergencies. Being a professional and qualified service provider we can cover all lock and security scenarios. Ranging from your home or place of residence, to your business, or even an emergency situation, we have got you covered.

We have 20 years of locksmith industry experience and are fully covered to handle any job. Regardless of the issue: being locked out of your or home at 2am or needing keys cut, we’re just a phone call away. We do repairs, rekeys, supply & fits for all locks and keys.

Our mobile service all includes all of the Mornington peninsula locksmith areas. We guarantee the best price for all work.

Why Choose Us?

Our experienced Locksmith Mornington team deliver reliable service that our customers expect & depend on. In an emergency, day or night call us, we will have a professional on hand to attend your issue. We can be with you within 45 minutes around the Mornington peninsula.

Locksmith Mornington

Rest assured. Every lock and key installation, every upgrade and replacement is covered by our 12 month warranty.

Our Services:

Residential Locksmith Mornington

We offer locksmith services for homes includ, repair, placement or re-keying of deadlocks, padlocks and front door locks. We also provide master key systems; restricted key systems; patio screen and sliding door locks; window-locks; front gate-locks; security systems; garage door and remote control locks. We can also cut keys, repairing and install safes, home security surveys and installations and much more.

Commercial Locksmith

In the commercial division locksmith services include the supply or repair of security systems for any type of commercial building, from small offices to retail shops. Whatever your needs, we have an expert locksmith to get the job done. We can also install or replace doorlocks, deadlocks, drop bolts and mortice cylinders. We can also provide restricted key access systems, repair safes including changing combinations, CCTV, master key systems and roller-door locks.

Emergency Locksmith

We’re here 24/7. Regardless of the time or the situation, we’re here to take your call. A call to our hotline will immediately connect you to a friendly knowledgeable locksmith who can be at most Mornington Peninsula locations within the hour. Lost your keys? Are you locked out of your home? Locked out of your office? Excellent locksmiths will ensure emergency access. We can secure your home or commercial building following a break-in.

How Do I Choose A Locksmith in Mornington?

Asap Locksmith Starting your own mobile locksmith business is a great opportunity as an entrepreneur, and protecting your inventory and equipment with proper van storage will improve the overall return on your investment as you begin your business.Outfit your van properly, and you will be more organized, efficient, and committed to your work. It's frustrating trying to accomplish a task when you have to search around a haphazardly arranged van arrangement to find the right tools or supplies.You don't need to buy a brand new van to start your mobile locksmith business; however, it would be a wise investment to spend some time and money on the storage ideas that will help you do your job more efficiently. Some of the higher vans allow you to actually move around inside and sit at a workbench while cutting keys, without the risk of banging your head whenever you need to locate a tool.Here are three things to consider when selecting van storage systems for your locksmith business.Plan Van Storage Space for a WorkbenchSince you are a mobile locksmith business, plan your storage space with a workbench in mind. Don't settle for standing outside, at the rear doors of your van. Put yourself inside your mobile office and get yourself out of the weather to do your work in comfort. Take time to measure out your space and find the best location for a workbench and a step stool for comfort. A good mobile workbench allows for six or seven feet of space to spread out and accomplish your tasks.A full-length workbench can accommodate a key machine as well as file storage and the locking drawers necessary for your keys and other supplies. Maximize the storage space at your workbench by including catalog organizers, hooks, safety equipment and other accessories that will make your job easier.Van Storage Should Include Locking DrawersThere is nothing more annoying than listening to hundreds of key blanks jangling like loud wind chimes while you are driving down the road. Storing your product in well-cushioned, locking drawers is a wise use of your cargo area. The keys will be protected from "road rash" marks from rubbing against each other or other items.Locking drawers as part of your storage space will also protect you from flying objects if you need to stop or swerve suddenly. Plus, it looks very professional to have drawers full of your product, categorized and ready to use.Van Storage is Best Organized with Adequate ShelvingOne of the most important storage concepts is to determine your shelving needs. What tools and equipment will you need for your mobile locksmith business? What storage location of these tools will make your work most efficient?Look at your van as a mobile work cell, and set it up as efficiently as possible. You will accomplish your service calls faster, and will be able to make more service calls throughout the day because your van storage plan has helped you become efficient.

Van Storage Ideas to Start a Mobile Locksmith Business

Gate Lock Are you thinking about becoming a locksmith? Many people ask me about my profession when I arrive at a job site. The idea of working with the public, working with hand tools, making a quick buck on lock-out calls, and of course the power and ability to unlock doors, cars and safes is quite intoxicating for some people. I don't place help wanted ads, but nevertheless I average one unsolicited résumé a month via e-mail. Usually it arrives from an eager teenager looking to do an apprenticeship. O.J.T. (on-the-job training) is a fine way to go if you can get the gig. That's precisely how I started. That and reading every trade magazine I could get my hands on, endless hours doing research on the web, taking classes, attending trade expos, and talking with any locksmith who would take the time to chat with me (and many would, so long as I wasn't one of their competitors). But that's how it is for most lock jocks. Once you begin work as a locksmith it gets under your skin. It consumes you and becomes an obsession. That's not exactly a bad thing after all; to be (God willing) financially successful at what you enjoy is a great way to pay the bills. There is, however, a price to pay that does not fit with most people's lifestyle, and thus -- the purpose of this article.The Good: Helping the public and making a few bucks while doing it. First off, I rarely charge to unlock a car or house when there is a child locked inside. When I get the call, usually from a panicked parent declaring his or her child is locked inside a car, I rush to the scene. There are few better moments for me as a locksmith than seeing the relief in a mother's eyes when I unlock the door and she pulls her child from a sweltering car on a warm summer day. "You're my HERO," she says as she holds her child close with tears in her eyes. "No charge ma'am. We don't charge for children locked in cars. If you like, for a small fee, I can make you a copy of your car's door key so it's less likely to happen again." They almost always say yes, and the payment for the key usually accompanies a tip. The "up sale" is simply to cover my gas going out on the call, and the tip, if any, buys me lunch.The rest of my jobs are typically for-profit jobs. Still, over half of what I charge goes right back into the company in the form of gas, insurance, advertising, trade organization dues, license fees, vehicle maintenance, tools, supplies, and other expenses.As a locksmith you will never get rich, but if you play your cards right you could retire well. The plan, as I read in a popular trade magazine, is to sell a well-established shop with a long list of customer accounts, while owning and collecting rent on the property the shop sits on. It's even better if you own an entire complex and collect rent from your shop's neighbors, too. I personally know a retired locksmith who did exactly this and I understand he is doing quite well for himself.Many locksmiths make and sell tools and/or reference books, or teach classes (as I do) to supplement their income.The Bad: Being on call 24/7. After-hours and weekend service can account for a large part, if not most when first starting out, of your income. Then there are the late night calls. 2am, half drunk and he can't find his car keys: "I'm sorry sir -- I can't help you drive your car tonight, but if you call me in the morning I will be happy to assist you."The locksmith industry is a highly regulated (but necessarily so) security industry. The licenses, insurances, and bonds you have to carry can cost a small fortune. I have a city business license, a state locksmith license, a State Contractor's License for lock and security work, two insurance policies (general liability and commercial vehicle insurance), two different bonds, and I am a member of two major national trade organizations. In California, you need to be fingerprinted and pass State and Federal background tests. I am also a member of some local organizations including the Chico Chamber of Commerce and the North Valley Property Owner's Association.The cost of running a business like this can be overwhelming and there is always another tool you need to buy, another software update, or replacement parts/tools that need to be ordered. I am currently saving up for a high security key machine that retails for $5,800.Let's not forget the paperwork. You will need to keep legal forms for customers to fill out and detailed records of who, what, where and when. The last thing you want to do is make keys to a car or house for someone who does not have authority to hold a key to that property.Lastly, buy a nice shirt and tie because there is a good chance you will find yourself in a court of law before long for, among other things, domestic disputes.The Ugly: Evictions, repossessions (R.E.O.'s), and re-keys after a domestic dispute. There are few things as humbling in this profession as writing a bill for after-hours service and handing the new keys over to someone wearing a fresh black eye. I vividly remember one woman who was standing next to a hole in the drywall where her head was forcibly inserted only a few hours earlier. The local sheriffs know me because it's not uncommon to perform the re-key and security checks while they are still there, filling out their report.Can you say fleas? Yep, now I keep flea powder in the van because you never know what condition a recently foreclosed house will be in.Angry former tenants who have been kicked out can also present a challenge. Sometimes the locks are disabled or destroyed, and I keep latex gloves in the van in case I ever have to pick open another lock that has been urinated on.The bottom line: I am quite happy being a locksmith, most of the time. The pay, the freedom of the job (I can leave my schedule open if my kids have a school event), and the satisfaction of helping people while making a profit for myself keeps me going.My advice to you:1. Do your research before entering the market as a locksmith. My town has too many locksmiths per capita. There is barely enough work to go around much of the time.2. Get on with another locksmith and be willing to relocate, as you may be required to sign a "no compete" contract saying you will not leave to be your boss's competitor. Locksmith schools are okay, but a seasoned locksmith can show you some tricks of the trade that can help you make higher profits or perform jobs better and quicker than the basic skills taught in most schools.3. Be willing to pay your dues. It will take many years to build up a customer base, and a name for yourself. A wise locksmith once told me it takes at least three years before they (the customers) know you're there, and seven before they notice you are gone.4. When you start out on your own, get an easy to recognize logo and put it on everything: your van, invoices, pens to hand out, and every other piece of advertising (see our logo below).5. C.Y.A. Document everything and have pre-printed, professionally prepared, legal forms for your customers to fill out.6. Don't get too carried away. If you have other obligations, like a spouse and/or kids, make sure to make time for them. It's hard to turn the phone off, or turn down calls because you're turning away money, but you can't get back the days you miss.A former employer of mine occasionally tells the story of how he made $2,000 in one weekend dispatching calls to his on-call locksmith, while he was on a boat on Lake Shasta with his wife. It was a rare weekend vacation for them and he spent a good part of the day on the phone. She died of cancer two short years later, and he later told me he would give just about anything to have that day back. I know this story personally as I was the on-call employee that weekend.To quote Uncle Ben (from Spider-Man, the movie): "With great power comes great responsibility." The ability to unlock doors, bypass alarm systems, unlock safes, and the inside knowledge of customers' security systems has been the downfall of unscrupulous locksmiths. In short, if you can't handle the temptation, don't pursue the profession.Finally: Never take advantage of someone. Like Grandpa always said, it can take a lifetime to build up a good reputation but only a moment to ruin it.Good luck in whatever you decide -- unless, of course, you are planning to open a lock shop in my service area. Combination Lock

 

Victoria Qualified Emergency Locksmith